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Les Paul BFG Limited

The BFG Limited is the most powerful, radical Les Paul Gibson has ever made. This raw, stripped-down version of the iconic Les Paul features a high-powered and uncovered Burstbucker 3 humbucker in the bridge, and a screaming single-coil P-90 in the neck, all controlled by two volumes and one tone knob. The traditional toggle switch has been rewired to act as a kill switch, and a smaller toggle at the volume knobs controls pickup selection. Rounding out this rock and roll machine is a rough sanded plain maple top on an worn finished, chambered mahogany body, perfectly matched to a one-piece mahogany neck with a ’50s rounded profile. There is no binding, no fretboard inlays, and the hardware has a unique distressed look that magnifies the BFG’s distinct, bare-bones look. The Les Paul BFG Limited is an innovative powerhouse that is part modern and part vintage, with unbeatable playability and a sharp attack that is both pure and powerful. It is available in four distinct finishes—Silver Burst, Bullion Burst, Ink Burst, and Natural. Production is limited to only 200 guitars per finish.

Silver Burst

Finishes

Silver Burst    Buillion Burst    Natural    Ink   

Hot Points

The Gibson Logo

The Gibson Logo
The most innovative and revolutionary stringed instruments of all time have carried the name Gibson—the Les Paul, the ES-335, the Explorer, the Flying V, the SG. The list goes on and on. There is no mistaking the classic, hand-crafted mother of pearl logo, inlayed into a pressed fiber-head veneer that is then glued to the face of the mahogany headstock. A thin coat of lacquer finishes the process. It is the most recognizable logo in all of music, representing more than a century of originality and excellence. There is simply no equal.



Angled Headstock

Angled Headstock
The angled headstock is another example of Gibson’s industry-changing way of thinking. Every Gibson headstock is carved out of the same piece of mahogany as the neck then fitted with Gibson’s traditional wing blocks. It is not a “glued-on” headstock, and the process takes craftsmanship, time, and effort. But the rewards are worth the effort. The headstock is carefully angled at 17 degrees, which increases pressure on the strings and helps them stay in the nut slots. An increase in string pressure also means there is no loss of string vibration between the nut and the tuners, which equals better sustain.



Adjustable Truss Rod

Adjustable Truss Rod
The adjustable truss rod is a Gibson innovation that revolutionized the guitar. Before this ground-breaking discovery in the early 1920s, the truss rod was used only to strengthen and stabilize the neck. By making it adjustable, the truss rod now allows a guitar to be set up using a variety of string gauges, as well as string heights. This easily accommodates any style of playing, and allows a limitless range of set-up options. And by placing it at the base of the headstock, the adjustable nut is easily accessible, even while the strings are still on the guitar.



Gibson’s ’50s Rounded Neck

Gibson’s ’50s Rounded Neck
No guitar neck profiles are more distinguishable than the neck profiles employed on the Gibson models of today. The more traditional ’50s neck profile—which is found on the Les Paul BFG—is the thicker, rounder profile, emulating the neck shapes found on the iconic 1958 and 1959 Les Paul Standards. The neck is machined in Gibson’s rough mill using wood shapers to make the initial cuts. But once the fingerboard gets glued on, the rest—including the final sanding—is done by hand. That means there are no two necks with the exact same dimensions. So while it still has the basic characteristics of its respective profile, each neck will be slightly different, with a distinct but traditional feel.



22-Fret Rosewood Fingerboard

22-Fret Rosewood Fingerboard
Rosewood has always graced the fingerboards of the world’s finest stringed instruments, including many of today’s Gibsons. The fingerboards on Gibson’s BFGs are constructed from the highest grade rosewood on the planet. The rosewood is personally inspected and qualified by Gibson’s team of skilled wood experts before it enters the factories to be fitted onto the neck of the BFG. The resilience of this dense and durable wood makes these fingerboards extremely balanced and stable, and gives each chord and note unparalleled clarity and bite. The 12-inch radius of the fingerboard provides smooth note bending capabilities and eliminates “dead” or “choked out” notes, common occurrences on fingerboards with lesser radiuses.



Nickel and Silver Alloy Fret Wire

Nickel and Silver Alloy Fret Wire
The fret wire on the Gibson models is a combination nickel and silver alloy (approximately 80 percent nickel and 20 percent silver) specifically designed for long life and superior wear. Gibson’s traditional “medium/jumbo” fret wire is first shaped by hand, then cut to an exact 12-inch radius. After hand pressing it into the fingerboard, a machine press finishes the job to eliminate the gap between the bottom of the fret wire and the fingerboard.



Gibson’s Set-Neck Construction

Gibson’s Set-Neck Construction
Like all classic Gibson guitars, the necks on Gibson’s Les Paul BFGs are distinguished by one of the more traditional features that have always set them apart—a glued neck joint. Gluing the neck to the body of the guitar ensures a “wood-to-wood” contact, no air space in the neck cavity, and maximum contact between the neck and body, allowing the neck and body to function as a single unit. The result? Better tone, better sustain, and no loose or misaligned necks.



Mahogany Back and Maple Top

Mahogany Back and Maple Top
There isn’t anything more critical than the marriage of the Les Paul’s mahogany back with a maple cap, as well as the regimen involved in selecting the right wood and the formula to dry it out. First, the wood is personally inspected and qualified by Gibson’s team of skilled wood experts before it enters the factories. These onsite inspectors also ensure that the plain maple comes from corporations adhering to the forest-saving standards of the Rainforest Alliance, of which Gibson is a proud member and sponsor. Inside the Gibson factories, humidity is maintained at 45 percent, and the temperature at 70 degrees. This ensures all woods are dried to a level of “equilibrium,” where the moisture content does not change during the manufacturing process. This guarantees tight-fitting joints and no expansion, and controls the shrinkage and warping of the woods, in addition to reducing the weight. It also improves the woods’ machinability and finishing properties, and adherence to glue. Consistent moisture content means that the BFG will respond evenly to temperature and humidity changes long after it leaves the factory.



Chambered Body

Chambered Body
There’s something about playing a guitar with raw, powerful tone, balance, and weight. One of the ways the expert craftsmen at Gibson USA achieve this equilibrium is by carving carefully mapped-out chambers in the Les Paul’s solid mahogany back using a Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) router before the maple top is glued on. The positioning of the routes was established after careful examination of the resonant characteristics of the Les Paul. Gibson approached this process with the awareness that every change to the formula would have repercussions on the instrument’s sound. So, in addition to relieving the stress on a player’s back and shoulder, these lighter Gibson guitars also enhance the tone palette in a manner unique only to these guitars. The results are comfortable, lightweight guitars that are acoustically louder, with increased sustain and resonance.



Surface Texture and Satin Nitrocellulose Finish

Surface Texture and Satin Nitrocellulose Finish
In almost every respect, the BFG is not an ordinary Les Paul—including the surface and texture of the body and neck. The most powerful, radical Les Paul needed a raw look, so Gibson’s designers decided to leave the surface carving marks on the solid maple top and mahogany body—exactly as they appear when they emerge from the rough mill. The body is then painted in Trans Gold, Trans Black, or Heritage Cherry Sunburst finishes, then hand-sanded to give it a tough, scale-like appearance. The neck is also given its initial finish, then hand-sanded to yield its own unique worn appearance. A smooth coat of satin nitrocellulose is then applied over the entire guitar, insuring less interference with the natural vibration of the instrument—producing a purer tone—and allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally and properly over the course of its life.



Gibson’s Burstbucker 3 and P-90 PICKUPS

Gibson’s Burstbucker 3 and P-90 PICKUPS
The Les Paul BFG demanded a pickup configuration as radical as the guitar itself, and the pairing of Gibson’s Burstbucker 3 with the classic P-90 is as intense as it gets. The Burstbucker 3 arrived on the scene in 1990, and—like the Burstbucker 1 and 2—represents Gibson’s drive to capture and recreate the characteristics of the vintage “Patent Applied For” humbuckers of the late 1950s. On the shop floor of the original Gibson plant in Kalamazoo, Michigan, the earliest Gibson PAF humbuckers were wound using imprecise machines, resulting in pickups with varying degrees of output and tone. The Burstbucker line represents those variations, but with some modern appointments. The Burstbucker 3 provides historically accurate PAF tone with two slightly overwound coils, creating a raw, airy tone packed with enough punch to cut through any mix. The legendary P-90 black soapbar, introduced in the early 1950s, Gibson’s truly legendary singlecoil pickup, and offers the soulful, classic tone that only a P-90 can. It delivers more warmth than a standard singlecoil pickup, for high output and sweet treble response. Together, they are one of the most powerful pickup combinations on any Les Paul. As with all Gibson pickups, every part is precisely manufactured at Gibson USA in Nashville, Tennessee, ensuring tight, seamless fittings, and superior workmanship.



Gibson’s Tune-O-Matic Bridge

Gibson’s Tune-O-Matic Bridge
The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954. At the time, it was a true revelation in intonation, and set a standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. This pioneering piece of hardware provides a firm seating for the strings, allowing the player to adjust and fine-tune the intonation and string height in a matter of minutes. It also yields a great union between the strings and body, which results in excellent tone and sustain. It is combined with a separate “stopbar” tailpiece, essentially a modified version of the earlier wraparound bridge. To this day, the Tune-o-matic remains the industry standard. It is the epitome of form and function in electric guitar bridge design, and is one of the most revered and copied pieces of guitar hardware ever developed.



Gallery

Les Paul BFG Limited - Silver Burst
Les Paul BFG Limited - Silver Burst
Les Paul BFG Limited - Silver Burst
Les Paul BFG Limited - Silver Burst


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